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Peter's 931 Rebuild
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Rick MacLaren  
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 2002 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No no Peter you didn't oversimplify it, not at all. It's more of a feeling I have from reading the board over the past few years, that's all - and it's partly due to the nature of the medium. We come to the board, we post our progress, and sometimes it seems as if "Oh, gee, a rebuild, my oh my isn't that straightforward!" So if I'm seeing that, I can only imagine how newbies view it. The medium doesn't really allow us to detail the processes, or to voice the hundreds of frustrations that happen along the way. Hundreds. Especially when you're contracting out services. People on the board seldom hear of these 'away from the board' happenings.

BTW, Ralph, my buddy from work, has been 5 months on his 944 Turbo. And all he did was spin #2 bearing. The problem was, he decided while he was in there to do a whack of replacing at the same time, and this resulted in having to order parts, etc.

Ralph uses Dixie cups. Even made tools to hold his head bolts, in order. He's so anal he has to pass a QA test to take a dump.

I used plastic zip lock baggies (assorted sizes) and margarine containers.

[ This Message was edited by: Rick MacLaren on 2002-10-15 16:07 ]
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Peter  
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2002 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A short update. As you can see, the engine was ready to be installed in the 931. I was lucky that my fiancée was available to help me with the install. I could not have done it without her. A complete engine is hard to maneuver, especially when you have the AC compressor and lines still in the engine bay. My fiancée operated the engine hoist, while I operated the load leveler (orange bar on top of engine) and maneuvered the engine around the AC, brake booster, and other stuff.
We got the engine in, but next time I would probably just install the block with head into the engine bay, and then put the other parts in after.
The hardest thing had to be moving the transmission and torque tube into the bell housing. I am not a weakling, but man I should have eaten my spinach before attempting this task. You have to lie on your back, and while you lift the tyranny/torque tube, you have to simultaneously push it toward the engine. This was hard! I was able to get the torque tube flange to within 1 inch of the bell housing, but it would not go any further. Turning the crank caused the input shaft to move, so I knew that the input shaft was within the clutch. Because my bran was limited, I decided to use my head. I used a transmission jack to lift the tranny to the proper height. Next I used a portable winch, hooked up between the tranny and the engine, to help pull the tranny toward the engine. This way I was free to use my hands and energy to give occasional tugs and pulls to help align the tube to bell housing. Of course, you must also hook up the shifter and dual shift rods while this is all happening.
In conclusion, all went well and the engine is in, with the torque tube properly attached to the bell housing and all bolts torqued to spec with a dab of red paint to warn of any loosening.

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Rick MacLaren  
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2002 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lucky it didn't rain

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Smoothie  
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2002 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

good one - "tyranny/tube"

Looks just like my car right down to the front spoiler condition. The rest of your paint looks better than mine though.
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Peter  
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2002 4:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rick, I am not afraid of the rain. You must have me confused with the US Postal Service.
Smoothie, I plan on painting the car after its up & running. However, the alley where I work on my car is only 2 cars wide. My dilemma is that I could only paint one side, then have to turn the car & paint the other --not a good thing, or park the car in the middle of the alley precluding anyone from getting through --also not a good thing.
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Smoothie  
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2002 4:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, I see you have some tactical problems working in the alley way. I think (if you don't mind my unsolicited opinion) a good approach would be to mask and paint all but the passenger side, then unmask the drivers side door and windows, turn around and repark (or just move it over to the left side of the alley (assuming it's one-way)) with the drivers' side blocked, climb out the passenger door, then mask and paint the passenger side.

I've been meaning to repaint mine, but I'm using the water restrictions as an excuse to let it go one more year - plus, I need to strip it first, but given a few more months that might not be necessary as the remaining paint could be done flaking off by then.

Yours actually looks pretty good. I thought a quick spray of the bottom-front would do it.
Is that color LA6V (Lhasa green metallic)?

_________________
'82 931 Lhasa Green

[ This Message was edited by: Smoothie on 2002-10-20 03:40 ]
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Peter  
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2002 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Smoothie, your suggestion seems like the only way to go. I could paint the driver's side, hood, roof, and rear in one day. Next day I would paint the passenger fender, door & rear panel.
My paint isn't so bad, but you know, why stop the rebuild at the engine. Why not paint the car. The official paint is "Mocca Schwarz" ALD 630 M9V, or as others have called it chocolate brown.
The best "paint your car site" that I have found is:
http://www.autobodystore.com
Many professional autobody men/woman frequent the site, and they seem eager to answer questions from newbies. The webmaster "LEN" puts out a 2hr "how to paint your car video" that I will be asking Santa to bring me.

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wdb  
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2002 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

many libraries have a video section with how-to video's . if they dont have a particular video, they can order it or borrow from another library . stop by or give them a call, they may have what your looking for.
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Peter  
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, I will give the local library a try.
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wdb  
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey redcar924, did you get that.
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dwak  
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peter, I certainly am in awe of your workmanship and admire your 'ain't worth doing unless done right ' policy but, if I put that much time and effort into something, I'd be afraid to thrash it around properly afterwards. A dilemma.
Don't get me wrong, I've always wanted to do a 100% car rebuild but I think I'd redesign a lot of the car at the same time. I'm not a purist but, hopefully, a pragmatist.
Anyhow, nice work, I'd buy one of your engines anyday. How much?
dwak the envious
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Smoothie  
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2002 3:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, mocca brown <> lhasa green. My slight color blindness was revealed with that one, but knowing now that it's brown, it does look it. That's what kept me out of computer repair in the navy (can't always tell for sure between certain shades of brown and green) - I went for computer operations instead.

I've painted a few of my own cars over the years. Most important is good prep and what requires the most skill is the spraying. My first paint job had just a couple of minor runs and it was a relatively heavy-bodied paint. I've always used 2-part polyurethane acrylic enamel - concerned mostly about durability. 2-part enamel paints have a catalyst added to make them dry faster and also to make them cure all the way through. Plain old enamel without a catalyst only dries on the surface and slowly, so it's best dried with heat lamps. Lacquer dries all the way through without a catalyst. Actually, the van that I did was acrylic lacquer color coats topped with clear 2-part polyurethane. Lacquer is thinner and dries faster, so there's less a problem with runs, but no matter what you use, you can have runs obviously if you lay it on too thick and too fast - exactly what most beginners want to do. Most people spraying without a booth prefer lacquer because it's easier to rub out and polish away any imperfections left by bugs, leaves and other airborne junk that hit the surface before it's dry. Most prone to runs would be enamel without a catalyst. Another point about runs: with something like a 2-part polyurethane top coat, you want to get it sprayed on thick enough so it drys with a smooth glossy finish and at the same time thin enough that it doesn't run. That makes it tricky. On the other hand, lacquer is going to be rubbed out and polished later anyway, so you can put it on in lighter coats being not so concerned with leaving a glossy finish by your spray technique. I've always painted outdoors on the driveway and keep an eye out for bugs and leaves and remove what can be removed asap, but some tiny bugs just get left because it would make more of a mess to try to remove them. Just let the paint dry and brush the poor fellas away later. You'll be left with their tiny feet stuck in the paint, but life's rough... I go for durability primarily and looks come in second, but you have to look close to see the imperfections. If you're more of a concours afficianado and painting outdoors, go for lacquer. Another advantage of lacquer over 2-part enamel is chip repair later, again because it's easier to apply and polish.
Another advantage of lacquer: It's not quite as unhealthy. Of course you have to avoid breathing vapors from any automotive paint, but 2-part paints are especially bad and carcinogenic.

[ This Message was edited by: Smoothie on 2002-10-24 10:47 ]
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Peter  
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2002 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Smoothie, thanks for the great info. I think you need to write a book on autopainting. Maybe you can answer my question below about air bubbles in the paint.

Another update. The drive train is all hooked up. The CV joints were cleaned, repacked with CV grease, & flipped to the opposite side. I also replaced the CV bolts with hex-head 12.9 grade ( 8 x 50 x 1.25) bolts. And yes the bolts are blue. And no I did not paint them. The blue is the anti-corrosion coating and they came that way from the factory. I am just happy they were pink! However, I did paint the exhaust-to-tranny supports black along with some underbody shields.
My reason for painting these parts is that during the summer, if all goes according to plan, I intend to paint the car. As such, I am trying to get some practice using the spray gun. It's a lot of fun spraying with the gun: I was just happy that the paint went on my product rather than on me . I used Black enamel (Rustoleum brand) and had to thin the paint a lot. This was probably because then can had been opened several months earlier. Hey, I used what I had lying around. Anyway, the primer and color went on well enough, but I noticed that there were a lot of little air bubbles in the paint. I assume I needed to adjust the gun to let out more paint. Any thoughts? I was using a siphon gun. I have no idea as to what tip size it had, it came with the Craftsman compressor. The compressor was set to 40psi.
Another question. I discovered that the shocks are Koni, obviously Yellow. However, on the bottom of the shock, right above where it fits into the lower mounting bracket, is the word "Top" (right next to the Koni brand name). The shocks are on the right way, however why would "Top" be on the bottom? Anyone with Koni Yellows can verify that everything is installed correctly? I am assuming that if the shocks were installed the other way, the word "Top" along with the Koni brand name would be upside down --and thus incorrectly installed. Right?

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Peter  
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2002 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Dwak, I just saw your post. Thanks for the compliment. As for selling rebuilt engines -- no way. This was a labor of love.
As a side note, my fiancée & I plan to move to CA, the San Francisco Bay Area, in a few years. She asked me if I plan on taking the two Porsches ( 1984 Euro 924 & 1980 931), and how would I get them there. Because I can't stand driving long distances (however, to the track is okay), I told her I would have them shipped. If that proved to be too costly & I had to leave them in NY, she asked me if I would sell them. I told here I would sooner blow them up then sell them! Mainly because none would appreciate the blood, sweat & tears that went into rebuilding and maintaining them, and as such, they would only offer a trivial amount for them. Thus I couldn't sell them. This may sound crazy, but hey, we all have our quirks.
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Smoothie  
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2002 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That shock thing is weird - "Top" on the bottom... My guess would be that for applications where the shock is mounted at an angle, the -side- that says "Top" should be uppermost? (but that -end- should still be down)

Bubbles - I'm guessing you're referring to bubbles in the paint after it's sprayed on the surface. The only experience I've had with actual bubbles in paint like that was when I sprayed the roof of my van. It was getting late and I really should have left it for the following day, but I kept going and as I did, the air became more humid. This was a clearcoat that I was spraying at the time and I wound up with billions and billions of tiny bubbles that en'mass gave the finish a cloudy appearance. I'm pretty convinced it was due to the humidity being too high. That's one thing you'll see in the paint instructions - spray only when the humidity is within certain limits. About 40% should be alright, 60% may be too high. Those were really tiny bubbles though and were only visible at all because it was clear paint. If you got bubbles in black paint, I don't know. It shouldn't have been caused by your spray gun settings or pressure though. Nothing you do there that I know of could make the gun spray out bubbles. Possibly a surface prep problem? I know for instance silicone can be a problem - paint won't stick to that. Do you have tiny spots that the paint didn't want to stick to... or are there actual bubbles? One thing you'd be learning about as you got closer to painting (if I didn't mention it here) is surface cleaners. The product from NAPA is called "Kleanz Easy". It's basically a wax remover - you wipe it all over the old finish before sanding, then again as a last step before painting. It has a strong solvent smell and is flammable (like everything else in automobile painting).
For bubbles in the paint before spraying - you'll normally mix paint in one container, then pour it into the spray gun cup through a paper & mesh funnel-strainer. They'll give you a bunch of these when you buy the paint. This eliminates bubbles in the paint when it's in liquid form.

[ This Message was edited by: smoothie on 2002-10-24 15:06 ]
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