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CIS to EFI conversion 4MB PDF D/L

 
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RC  



Joined: 25 Mar 2007
Posts: 2612
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 1:55 am    Post subject: CIS to EFI conversion 4MB PDF D/L Reply with quote

On a 911 however the principle is similar.

http://www.bitzracing.com/docs/CIS_to_EFI_manual.pdf
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Rich H  



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 2665
Location: Preston, Lancs, UK

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My version for the 924 N/A

EFI for the 924

You will need:


Ford Mondeo fuel rail (Probably a 1.6 Duratec engine, new if possible, you will be welding to it)
4x injectors (I have cream top 21 lb/hr, standard Mondeo ones are a bit small)
Adjustable fuel pressure regulator(Min 3 bar)
944 expansion tank
Cone filter and 76mm pipe work(Air box is going in the bin)
Megasquirt (I have a MS1)
Mega Stim (Makes checking your Megasquirt much easier!)
Lambda sensor and boss (I have a wideband Innovate, but narrow band will do at a push!)
Air intake temp sensor
Coolant temperature sensor
Ali and steel for brackets
Nuts, bolts & washers
Lots of cable
Lots of pipe
Lots of solder
Lots of heatshrink
Lots and lots of time

Options:
Locked dizzy (Pull it apart and replace the little advance springs with locking wire and secure the vacuum advance solidly)
Or
36-1 Trigger wheel
Ford EDIS
Ford coil pack
Ford HT leads
Dizzy blanking plate

Stripping out the CIS


Disconnect the battery!! (Stick it on charge, you will be a while!)

Remove:
Airbox
Air meter
Fuel injectors and bungs (Will be stuck)
Fuel pipe work from the filter to return hard line
The TIU, TTS, WUR & CSV can all go too(Back of the head, by the dizzy)
Expansion tank
Coolant temp switch for the air meter replace with copper pipe
Rubber intake boot for air meter(Leave the hard pipe and the throttle body boot)

Optional removals:
Coil (If going wasted spark/EDIS)
Dizzy(If going wasted spark/EDIS)
Wiring to removed items(I tied it all back to begin with and stripped it out later on)


Mechanical fit:


Fit the coolant sender in the place of the TTS (I needed an M14 adapter for mine)

Fit the intake air temp sender in the hard intake pipe (There is a flat spot on the back which I drilled)

Fit dizzy blank or locked dizzy (Depending on spark option)

Fit 36-1 trigger wheel (EDIS only!)

Fit wheel sensor (EDIS only! Bit rubbish on mine)

Fit coil pack somewhere within reach of your coil leads (O/S inner wing on mine)

Fit 944 expansion tank to N/S wing.

Remove the blanking plate by the throttle cable adjust(To clear injectors)

Replace blanking plate with thinner plate and bolts

Cut mounting legs off the fuel rail (If the rail is second hand flush with solvents and leave overnight)

Trial fit injectors and rail to mark up brackets (I used ¾” wide steel bar and picked up cam cover studs)

Silver solder brackets to fuel rail (Weld if you can!)

Refit and adjust to get a good fit. (My mounts have a bolted on part that can be adjusted)


The injectors must be clamped squarely between the rail and the head! 3 Bar fuel goes a long way!

Get this stage right as you cannot easily re-weld the rail if it has been filled with fuel.


Mount fuel pressure regulator (I used the coil mount but anywhere intake side will do)

Make up a vacuum take off that fits in the CSV hole (I used brass plate and soldered a brass tube to it)

Make up intake pipe work; don’t forget a take off for the brake servo (I used washing machine fittings!)

Fit cone filter and brackets to support it. (Remember to ensue that there is some flex)

Plumb in the fuel pipe work (Use injection pipe and good quality clips!)

Filter to fuel rail

Fuel rail to pressure regulator (Get the “in” and “out” the right way round!)

Pressure regulator to return line (Pressurise the system with the fuel pump to 3 bar, fix any leaks, be careful!)

Your car is now fuel proof again

Plumb in the vacuum line from the CSV take off to the Megasquirt

“T” in a take off for the fuel pressure regulator. (This compensates for manifold pressure, a plastic T is fine)

Plumb in the 944 tank, just needs 2 longer pipes

Fit the lambda probe somewhere in the exhaust pipe work. It needs to go in the collector pipe so it sees gas from all 4 cylinders (Mine is fitted in pipe in front of the centre box as the centre box is cheap to replace if it went wrong!).

Electrical fit:

This is very much dependant on what you have chosen to do. Its pretty much a case of wiring each sensor and injector in accordance with the Megasquirt diagrams, be careful you have the right diagram for your Megasquirt beware that you have the right soft ware loaded too. I use the latest Megasquirt Extra code; this gives all the spark control options and loads of other stuff too.

Things to watch:

1. Existing wiring is old and rubbish, earths are generally poor and need work.

2. If you don’t need to disturb something, leave it alone! The AAV is a good example of this, if it works, leave it, you have enough problems already!

3. Make sure each joint is good, sleeve it in heatshrink and secure the wiring as often as you can, it will make fault finding easier if you don’t have to check for broken joints!

4. Use proper plugs if you can. The make better contact and make changing things easier! Injectors are a prime example. The sockets are hard to find but not that expensive when you do (Junior timer female sockets)

5. Avoid snap lock /scotch locks. Do it properly. Enough said.

6. Fuse things. I know the battery is nearby, but if it goes wrong, fuses are cheap, ECUs are expensive!

7. Chock-blocks / Screw terminals are useful for prototyping and test, once it’s all proven, solder and sleeve it! Stop being lazy!

I brought all the wiring in through 4 x 15mm holes next to the cabin air intake, above the passenger foot well and sealed it all with silicone. The wires first come through holes in the firewall then down into the cabin, this is to minimise the exposure of the cabin holes to the engine bay fumes.

I took power from the fuel pump relay socket, it can provide significant power (16A) and also has the permanent live, the ignition switched live and the fuel pump feed too. I just used spade connectors to plug into it.

I mounted the ECU and EDIS units under the glove box on an ali plate secured to the LHD pedal box mount. Also bolted to this is the relays and the fuse box (Well is should be, haven’t quite finished that yet!) The tacho can be wired to the EDIS unit, but mine has gremlins are the moment and does not always work!

The wiring is extensive and complex, there is a lot of it all coming into one place and its confusing, use different coloured wire where you can and if you have to use the same colour then mark it at both ends! (I didn’t and fault finding was a nightmare)

Take your time to get all the sensors working properly, use Easy Therm to calibrate them. It will make things easier if they are 100% (Mine are about 80% accurate and a pain!)

And finally

After you have wired everything up then check and double check the Megasquirt gets power on the right pins and the earths are good (No resistance to the negative terminal of the battery) unplug the fuel pump feed, plug in the laptop and switch on the ignition. It should show up on the laptop with all the correct temperatures and pressures. If it does, well done! More likely it doesn’t then its time to start fault finding! Sadly you are pretty much on your own… I was!

It is now time to gather your fire extinguisher, take your brave pills and plug in the fuel pump…

It won’t start, but it should turn over…

Once things start to move in the right direction then it’s just a matter of tuning. The Megasquirt website and forums are your friends. There is so much variation from car to car and install to install there is little or no point in sharing tables, but if you need help or have any questions drop me a line and I’ll do what I can!

Regards and good luck![/quote]
_________________
1994 Lotus Esprit S4 - Work in progress...
1980 Porsche 924 S2 DITC Turbo - Original spec
1978 Homo-Sapiens - Tired spec
1953 Landrover S1 - Pensioner Spec
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CorsePerVita  



Joined: 25 Jul 2008
Posts: 1990
Location: Redmond, Oregon

PostPosted: Sun May 17, 2009 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rich H wrote:
My version for the 924 N/A

EFI for the 924

You will need:


Ford Mondeo fuel rail (Probably a 1.6 Duratec engine, new if possible, you will be welding to it)
4x injectors (I have cream top 21 lb/hr, standard Mondeo ones are a bit small)
Adjustable fuel pressure regulator(Min 3 bar)
944 expansion tank
Cone filter and 76mm pipe work(Air box is going in the bin)
Megasquirt (I have a MS1)
Mega Stim (Makes checking your Megasquirt much easier!)
Lambda sensor and boss (I have a wideband Innovate, but narrow band will do at a push!)
Air intake temp sensor
Coolant temperature sensor
Ali and steel for brackets
Nuts, bolts & washers
Lots of cable
Lots of pipe
Lots of solder
Lots of heatshrink
Lots and lots of time

Options:
Locked dizzy (Pull it apart and replace the little advance springs with locking wire and secure the vacuum advance solidly)
Or
36-1 Trigger wheel
Ford EDIS
Ford coil pack
Ford HT leads
Dizzy blanking plate

Stripping out the CIS


Disconnect the battery!! (Stick it on charge, you will be a while!)

Remove:
Airbox
Air meter
Fuel injectors and bungs (Will be stuck)
Fuel pipe work from the filter to return hard line
The TIU, TTS, WUR & CSV can all go too(Back of the head, by the dizzy)
Expansion tank
Coolant temp switch for the air meter replace with copper pipe
Rubber intake boot for air meter(Leave the hard pipe and the throttle body boot)

Optional removals:
Coil (If going wasted spark/EDIS)
Dizzy(If going wasted spark/EDIS)
Wiring to removed items(I tied it all back to begin with and stripped it out later on)


Mechanical fit:


Fit the coolant sender in the place of the TTS (I needed an M14 adapter for mine)

Fit the intake air temp sender in the hard intake pipe (There is a flat spot on the back which I drilled)

Fit dizzy blank or locked dizzy (Depending on spark option)

Fit 36-1 trigger wheel (EDIS only!)

Fit wheel sensor (EDIS only! Bit rubbish on mine)

Fit coil pack somewhere within reach of your coil leads (O/S inner wing on mine)

Fit 944 expansion tank to N/S wing.

Remove the blanking plate by the throttle cable adjust(To clear injectors)

Replace blanking plate with thinner plate and bolts

Cut mounting legs off the fuel rail (If the rail is second hand flush with solvents and leave overnight)

Trial fit injectors and rail to mark up brackets (I used ¾” wide steel bar and picked up cam cover studs)

Silver solder brackets to fuel rail (Weld if you can!)

Refit and adjust to get a good fit. (My mounts have a bolted on part that can be adjusted)


The injectors must be clamped squarely between the rail and the head! 3 Bar fuel goes a long way!

Get this stage right as you cannot easily re-weld the rail if it has been filled with fuel.


Mount fuel pressure regulator (I used the coil mount but anywhere intake side will do)

Make up a vacuum take off that fits in the CSV hole (I used brass plate and soldered a brass tube to it)

Make up intake pipe work; don’t forget a take off for the brake servo (I used washing machine fittings!)

Fit cone filter and brackets to support it. (Remember to ensue that there is some flex)

Plumb in the fuel pipe work (Use injection pipe and good quality clips!)

Filter to fuel rail

Fuel rail to pressure regulator (Get the “in” and “out” the right way round!)

Pressure regulator to return line (Pressurise the system with the fuel pump to 3 bar, fix any leaks, be careful!)

Your car is now fuel proof again

Plumb in the vacuum line from the CSV take off to the Megasquirt

“T” in a take off for the fuel pressure regulator. (This compensates for manifold pressure, a plastic T is fine)

Plumb in the 944 tank, just needs 2 longer pipes

Fit the lambda probe somewhere in the exhaust pipe work. It needs to go in the collector pipe so it sees gas from all 4 cylinders (Mine is fitted in pipe in front of the centre box as the centre box is cheap to replace if it went wrong!).

Electrical fit:

This is very much dependant on what you have chosen to do. Its pretty much a case of wiring each sensor and injector in accordance with the Megasquirt diagrams, be careful you have the right diagram for your Megasquirt beware that you have the right soft ware loaded too. I use the latest Megasquirt Extra code; this gives all the spark control options and loads of other stuff too.

Things to watch:

1. Existing wiring is old and rubbish, earths are generally poor and need work.

2. If you don’t need to disturb something, leave it alone! The AAV is a good example of this, if it works, leave it, you have enough problems already!

3. Make sure each joint is good, sleeve it in heatshrink and secure the wiring as often as you can, it will make fault finding easier if you don’t have to check for broken joints!

4. Use proper plugs if you can. The make better contact and make changing things easier! Injectors are a prime example. The sockets are hard to find but not that expensive when you do (Junior timer female sockets)

5. Avoid snap lock /scotch locks. Do it properly. Enough said.

6. Fuse things. I know the battery is nearby, but if it goes wrong, fuses are cheap, ECUs are expensive!

7. Chock-blocks / Screw terminals are useful for prototyping and test, once it’s all proven, solder and sleeve it! Stop being lazy!

I brought all the wiring in through 4 x 15mm holes next to the cabin air intake, above the passenger foot well and sealed it all with silicone. The wires first come through holes in the firewall then down into the cabin, this is to minimise the exposure of the cabin holes to the engine bay fumes.

I took power from the fuel pump relay socket, it can provide significant power (16A) and also has the permanent live, the ignition switched live and the fuel pump feed too. I just used spade connectors to plug into it.

I mounted the ECU and EDIS units under the glove box on an ali plate secured to the LHD pedal box mount. Also bolted to this is the relays and the fuse box (Well is should be, haven’t quite finished that yet!) The tacho can be wired to the EDIS unit, but mine has gremlins are the moment and does not always work!

The wiring is extensive and complex, there is a lot of it all coming into one place and its confusing, use different coloured wire where you can and if you have to use the same colour then mark it at both ends! (I didn’t and fault finding was a nightmare)

Take your time to get all the sensors working properly, use Easy Therm to calibrate them. It will make things easier if they are 100% (Mine are about 80% accurate and a pain!)

And finally

After you have wired everything up then check and double check the Megasquirt gets power on the right pins and the earths are good (No resistance to the negative terminal of the battery) unplug the fuel pump feed, plug in the laptop and switch on the ignition. It should show up on the laptop with all the correct temperatures and pressures. If it does, well done! More likely it doesn’t then its time to start fault finding! Sadly you are pretty much on your own… I was!

It is now time to gather your fire extinguisher, take your brave pills and plug in the fuel pump…

It won’t start, but it should turn over…

Once things start to move in the right direction then it’s just a matter of tuning. The Megasquirt website and forums are your friends. There is so much variation from car to car and install to install there is little or no point in sharing tables, but if you need help or have any questions drop me a line and I’ll do what I can!

Regards and good luck!
[/quote]


Do you have any pictures of your finished setup and an idea of how much weight was removed, and perhaps horsepower gained?
_________________
- 1977 Porsche 924 2.0 N/A (Trackday Project)
- 1979 Porsche 924 2.0 N/A (The other daily)
- 1980 Porsche 931 (Daily)
- 1987 Lamborghini Jalpa
- 1999 Ducati 900SS
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